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  • in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66051

    Rommel
    Participant

    Please excuse me for my outragous statement in the post on
    Venezuela. We get more than pennies on the barrel for our oil.

    Actually, according to this report, we are getting about 12 % on the
    profits for oil taken from the Gulf of Mexico. This is less than what
    you pay to the government on the profit you claim, for selling your
    time to your employer at a loss. I love this concept, don’t you ?

    The oil companies would have you believe that the taxpayers
    get more than adaquate compensation due to the high taxes
    they pay on their more than healthy profits, however, many
    corporations pay a much lower percentage rate than you do.

    The investors pay a much lower rate on thier profits too.

    Taxes can be some funny stuff : proftt, loss, liability, assest,
    on shore, off shore, national charter, international charter …
    and last but not least … The World Trade Organization Treaty.

    On a profit ( after costs ) of $ 100 on the sale of a barrel of oil,
    you, the taxpayers as a whole, the rightful owners, receive
    about $ 12 off of your tax burdern. A tax burden that is much
    higher, due to the continuous wars that we wage to protect,
    not Americans nor our freedoms, but the freedom of corporations
    to take whatever they want, where ever they find it, for as
    little as possible, without regard for anything but their profits.

    Note to ALL :

    I am not interested in continuing this thread as a solo act.

    Na-Nu Na-Nu

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66052

    Rommel
    Participant

    U.S. June crude oil exports highest since 1957Rueters


    Although a decades-old U.S. law generally bars exports of domestically produced
    crude, shipments to Canada are broadly allowed, as are re-exports of foreign oil.

    But a growing excess of particularly light crude is prompting companies to find
    ways around the ban, including by lightly processing a super-light form of oil
    known as condensate in order to get around restrictions on raw crude. The first
    such cargo sailed from Texas bound for east Asia in late July.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66054

    Rommel
    Participant

    Have you ever wondered why the United States of America hates Venezuela ?

    We do you know. We hate Venezuela. Not just the leaders, as you’ve
    been told, but the people as well. Even our great Christian leader and
    Republican Presidential Candidate, Pat Robertson called for the blood of
    their popular and democratically elected President, Hugo Chávez.

    You can find video proof of this, using his name and “take him out”.
    Isn’t killing an elected President a hate crime against the people ?

    The most disturbing thing about Chávez, to me, was that my random
    interviews of Americans, revealed that most hated him, even though
    they could not provide a valid reason for their feelings.

    Almost everyone interviewed, thought he was a dictator. After being
    educated to the fact that he was not a dictator, they responded with,
    “He’s a Socialist”, although, when pressed to give examples and explain,
    they did not know why they wanted to see him killed. Even worse, most
    did not seem capable of changing their minds, in spite of this.

    Venezuela to close border with Colombia at night to fight smuggling

    By Agence France-Presse
    Sunday, August 10, 2014 4:45 EDT




    Venezuela, which has the largest proven oil reserves in the world, also
    sells gas for some of the cheapest prices — allowing consumers to fill
    the tank of a car for the equivalent of a candy bar or bottle of water.


    Perhaps it has something to do with their insistance that Venezuelan
    oil belongs, not to the oil companies but, to the native people and
    that as the rightful owners, they demand to be properly paid for it.

    We give our oil to the oil companies for pennies on the barrel and
    Venezuela, must be forced to do the same. Thus, it seems likely
    that we will take additional action against them in the near future.

    The article linked a couple of posts down indicates that the oil
    compaines pay a royality of about 12% on the profits from oil
    removed from the Gulf of Mexico.

    Yes, even more serious than removing their democratically
    elected President and installiing our own puppet President.

    That didn’t work out very well for us in Venezuela and as
    we all should know, it hasn’t worked well in other places.

    edit – 1 : See introductory text in gray.
    edit -2a : Corrected the mispelling of Chávez.
    edit -2b : Corrected “pennies on the barrel’.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66053

    Rommel
    Participant

    When beggars die, there are no comets seen;
    The heavens themselves blaze forth the death of princes.

    – from Julius Caesar, by William Shakespeare

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66055

    Rommel
    Participant

    Under current conditions, when France is experiencing economic, financial and
    budgetary difficulties, it’s at least suicidal to harm our exports to Russia, which
    are important and necessary for the creation of jobs in France and for our trade
    balance. The government and the EU are acting as fools. – Jacques Myard


      Yes, I see it. Is it a star ?
      No, it has a long tail.
      Is it a comet ?
      No, there are too many. Look over there.
      Is it a meteor shower ?
      No, they are going in all directions.
      Then what is it Daddy ?
      The answer to our prayers.

    I hope that all of you get to see the Perseids on the 11th and 12th of August.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66050

    Rommel
    Participant

    According to the news article published in today’s Telegraph :

    Vladimir Putin has agreed a $20bn (£11.8bn) trade deal with Iran that will see
    Russia sidestep Western sanctions on its energy sector. Under the terms of a
    five-year accord, Russia will help Iran organise oil sales as well as “cooperate
    in the oil-gas industry, construction of power plants, grids, supply of machinery,
    consumer goods and agriculture products”, according to a statement by the
    Energy Ministry in Moscow.

    Do you see what I see ? – Noël Regney, 1962

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66056

    Rommel
    Participant


    Let them drink oil !

    Aug 5 (Reuters) – Oil prices tumbled on Tuesday, with Brent crude falling to a
    nine-month low as ample supplies in Europe and North America outweighed
    fears that violence in the Middle East and North Africa could disrupt production.

    Worries about prolonged geopolitical tensions in key producing regions had
    prompted a short rebound, but in the absence of supply disruptions, the
    market resumed its downward trend on Tuesday as traders and investors
    grew more nervous about seasonal weak demand and poor refinery
    margins in a market that appears to be abundantly supplied.

    “We continue to see material risk to supply from Libya, Iraq and Russia, but the
    market over the past six weeks has become increasingly complacent regarding
    supplies,” said Tim Evans, an energy futures specialist at Citigroup in New York.

    I’m still standing by my prediction but in order for oil prices to top $ 120 a
    barrel before 2015, we need a very dramatic disruption of the oil supply.

    Perhaps those in charge will decide to eliminate Iranian production entirely.
    Whatever happens, I don’t foresee lower gasoline prices in your futrures.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66059

    Rommel
    Participant

    Unlike last year, when the large urban areas with the worst drought
    were either in Colorado, Texas or New Mexico, this year they are all
    in California. Further, while last year exceptional drought covered no
    more than 72% of any of the urban areas with the worst drought,
    this year exceptional drought covers at least 75% of all the urban
    areas on our list. – Thomas C. Frohlich, July 30, 2014


      Water drying, babes dying,
      Steal the fish along their shore,
      Stop wailing, banks are failing,
      This is what they have in store.

      Copyright – Rommel


    Edit – 1 :
    Corrected the thrid line of the poem.
    The original structure was 7 syllables per line.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66058

    Rommel
    Participant

    SHAZAM !!! That was quick.

    Oil Rebounds From Six-Month Low as U.S. Equities Advance By Moming Zhou – August 04, 2014

    For those that couldn’t find the statement most likely to be false :

      ; ^ )

    I’ll give you one more hint … but this will be the last one.

    Wall Street Frets That You’re Getting Paid Too Much By Peter Coy – August 01, 2014

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66057

    Rommel
    Participant


    Try to find the statement most likely to be false :

    ( A ) – Global Crude Oil Price Plummets Due to Oversupply
    ( B ) – Major Oil Storage Tanks Are Attacked In Tripoli
    ( C ) – Crude Oil Prices Can Be Expected to Rebound

    ( 1 ) – Employers Expected to Give Employee Raises.

    For Those That Still Need A Hint, I’ll Give You Three More :

      ; ^ )

    ( 1 ) The Pope has asked employers to pay more fairly.
    ( 2 ) Three of these statements are recent headlines.
    ( 3 ) Headlines are not always true.

      Copyright – August 3, 2014

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66048

    Rommel
    Participant

    In the end we will remember not the words of our enemies,
    but the silence of our friends. – Martin Luther King, Junior

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66049

    Rommel
    Participant

    Hi All :

    The price of oil can be expected to top $ 120.00 a barrel before 2015.

    That’s not a headline, it’s my prediction based on observed events.
    When ( I didn’t say if for a reason ) the U.S.A. crude oil export limits
    are removed, we will begin in earnest to take as much of the Russian
    market as we can supply by using EU sanctions against Russian oil.

    That means, as one oil baron recently told the U.S.A. Senate :
    “We need to pump as much as we can as quickly as we can.”
    – Semi-quote from the owner of the majority of the shale claims.

    It seems, from the two contradictory headlines in yesterday’s post,
    that the general public of the U.S.A. does not have the ability to
    recognize the truth, unless they are directly impacted by it. Even
    then many of us seem oblivious to the repeated impacts.

    Headlines like that, seem to jump out at me and scream BOOO !

    There was a scientific ( oh my ) study released a few days ago that
    indicated that those raised in religious households were less likely to
    discern fact from fiction than those not reared in religious households.

    Boston Study

    Hopefully this was an inexpensive study as common sense tells us
    that those that are programmed from an early age, not to ask the
    hard questions and to believe things without proof, aren’t likely, as
    adults, to question those that they consider to be their superiors.

    If there are any readers here with a distaste for distasteful truth,
    please do not watch the linked video. It is not Alice Cooper’s song.

    School’s Out Forever !

    With Elevated Blood Pressure, I Remain … Sincerely Yours,

    Rommel

    P.S. – Harold G. Hamm is the person alluded to above, as an oil baron.

    Although puzzling, his name and the company name had slipped my mind.
    According to today’s issue of Forbes, his net worth is $ 19.6 BILLION.

    To put his net worth into perspective :

    He is making a fortune selling your children’s oil reserves.
    If he spent $ 2 MILLION per day, for the next 25 years, he
    would still leave a very sizable inheritence to his heirs.

    Your heirs ? As always, and rightly so, that’s up to you.

    Funny stuff … isn’t it ?

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66060

    Rommel
    Participant

    Hi Again …

    Hmmn … Perhaps you are right but I’m not looking for a mate and thus,
    could care less what anyone thinks about the car I drive, my appearance
    or much of anything else. Thus, I tend to believe that much of the drive to
    appear superior has it’s roots in the desire to obtain and keep a mate.

    @zombie wrote:

    It is the basic human nature directly taken from apes to look / feel better
    from peers. Even a feather from bird will make difference. So nothing to
    worry about winsconsin calander. But if you look other way i / we r better
    than you attitude has made so much evolution and discoveries possible.
    Eternal quest for remaining different / best is also important.

    Looking the other way, I see that it is not those that attempt to look
    superior that make the great discoveries, but those that are superior.

    The intentional stiffling of intelect is one of the worlds greatest sins.

    I’ll leave you with these two headines from todays news :

    American Consumer Confidence Hits New High

    One Third of Americans Are In Debt Collection

    Funny stuff indeed …

    Take Good Care,

    Rommel

    Edit – 1a : Added Bold and Color Emphasis to the Headlines.
    Edit – 1b : Reformatted the Quote from zombie.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66061

    Rommel
    Participant

    Hi Zombie :

    The problem I foresee with moving to electric transportation in the near
    future is that much of the electricity generated in the U.S.A. is made by
    burning fossil fuels.
    @zombie wrote:

    Some type of war will contineu till we depend upon fossil energy. Few
    europian countries has taken pledge for not using fossil energy for
    transport after 2020. USA should also make some sort of pledge. then
    USA will use chinese solar panels . Off course it will be another cause
    of war. 🙂

    There are some additional restraints as well. Such as :

    the poor condition of our national grid and our current
    inability to produce enough peak power for everyone.

    Smart meters will solve the peak demand issues.

    Sorry for the power interuption but it’s your day.

    From an ecological perpective, burning diesel fuel,
    for transportation may prove to be less harmful to
    the environment than increased electrical production.

    Not gasoline or gasahol, but stinky old diesel fuel.
    Properly combusted, diesel is a clean burning fuel.

    Funny stuff I know but I’ll let the readers confirm the
    efficiencies and polutants from both and come to
    their own conclusions on the morality of forcing a
    nation wide switch to electric cars.

    Until solar panels are more efficient and provide an
    expected lifespan of 40 years, it seems unlikely that
    many American homeowners will invest in the panels.

    Currently, in the U.S.A. the expected payback period is
    equal to the twenty year expected lifespan of the panels.

    An off-grid home system, that pays for itself in 10 years
    but lasts for 40 years seems to be the proper incentive.

    ; ^ )

    Next message …

    P.S. – I’m not sure about the quality of your diesel
    fuel but here, we are burning ultra low sulpher.

    Sulpher emissions and acid rain cause problems.

    in reply to: The cost to Americans to secure some oil #66062

    Rommel
    Participant


    There ain’t nowhere to hide on the front line. –
    Crobot

    According to this report from WTRG Economics :

    Wednesday, July 23, 2014: NYMEX West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil
    Price for September delivery closed up $0.73 at $103.12 per barrel.

    I suspect that today, the price is higher still.

    Welcome Back Zombie !
    That was a good joke.

    This just in from the Wall Street Journal :

    Global oil prices rose to a two-week high on Friday as investors
    prepared for more market-roiling headlines from Ukraine and the
    Middle East over the weekend.

    Brent crude for September delivery rose $1.32, or 1.2%, at $108.39 a
    barrel, the highest closing price since July 10 on the ICE Futures Europe
    exchange. It was the largest one-day gain for the global benchmark
    since June 12.

    Light, sweet crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange
    ended almost flat, up 2 cents to $102.09 a barrel.

    WTI fell hard on Thursday but closed slightly
    higher today at $ 102.09. Oh happy joy !

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 1,581 total)