This topic contains 30 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Rommel 8 years, 3 months ago.

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  • #56473

    Rommel
    Participant

    Hi POM :

    I love a mystery, don’t you?

    It seems a bit odd that the external worked fine before the laptop was shipped off but wouldn’t work after the laptop returned. Perhaps that is a clue.

    IF her laptop was returned, set up EXACTLY the same, in regard to the file system in use by the operating system at the time she made the back up ….

    I stand by suggestions.

    Further attempts to access this drive may destroy data and thus, it is essential that only someone qualified in HDD repair, with all the tools required at the ready, power up this drive and if possible transfer the data.

    I have on several occassions gotten a failed drive back up for one final run and succsesfully transferred most if not all of the files without costing the customer the expense of a data recovery specialist.

    Then again :

    You could change the cables around and power it up 10 or 12 times. This will not help.

    Then burn some incennse (drives away evil spirits) and try it several more times. This will not help.

    Then finally dismantle the box and set the drive up as an internal in another computer only to have the same symptoms and possibly destroy her remaining data. This will not help either.

    Good luck,

    Rommel

    P.S. – She should consider her options carefully before proceeding, She may only get one shot at it depending on the path taken.

    #56474

    Rommel
    Participant

    Additional options she may have available if the worst happens.

    If she has supplied paper or electronic pages to friends or family, try to retrieve these ASAP.

    The cost of clean room data recovery seemed out of her range is why I suggested using a local option and reserving a DR facility as the final option.

    Although much more expensive, if the book seems likely to be a good seller, and the missing pages can’t be retrieved by any other method, she should be able to find financial support to help with the recovery.

    How many copies do I get for $ 100 ?

    Best wishes

    #56475

    Rommel
    Participant

    Back to the mystery question then since no one blasted me …

    If the laptop is running XP, she has one of two possible file systems that she may be using :

    FAT32 or NTFS

    If the data was recorded to the backup in one and is trying to be retrieved by the other, I would expect an error message to that effect. This seems odd. Still, considering the two file system option, and the way this issue came about, it seems that making sure that both the external drive and the OS are using the same file system would be a safe and prudent next step.

    The tech support people may be able to find this information based on the serial number, the build record and service record.

    That is unless Yusef has another idea, if so, perhaps you should go with his instead.

    #56476

    pastor of muppets
    Participant

    Thanks for the suggestions guys I’ve been passing info on it’s her (or actually my sisiters) drive so they will get to decide what is tried. I have requested the brand and model number they are supposed to call later tonight.

    #56477

    Irishbandit
    Participant

    @peanutsrevenge wrote:

    Also, how old is the drive… Most drives came with 5 year warrenties (altho that’s down to 3 with most companies now), might be worth giving the manufacturer a call and explaining the situation, they MIGHT be able to help, with external drives often be used for backup, if they fail.. people tend to end up in POMs nieces postion (I won’t say screwed, cos that would be wrong on SOO many levels).

    The warranties cover the drives not the data usually. If it is an external usb drive that was purchased as such it will have a 1 year warranty in the U.S. If you purchase the hard drive and external enclosure separately, and build it yourself the hard drive will have a 3-5 year warranty but not usually for the data.

    #56478

    PeanutsRevenge
    Participant

    @irishbandit wrote:

    The warranties cover the drives not the data usually. If it is an external usb drive that was purchased as such it will have a 1 year warranty in the U.S. If you purchase the hard drive and external enclosure separately, and build it yourself the hard drive will have a 3-5 year warranty but not usually for the data.

    Are you sure as an external it will likely have only a 1 year warranty? I’ve not seen an external with such a short warranty (although TBH, it’s not something I research much), just had a quick flick around and they’re all 3-5 as usual.

    However, you’re entirely right regarding data cover, however, sometimes they will at least ‘help’ with the cost of recovery, depending on the company and the model purchased (it’s things like this that splits the highly recommended companies from the recommdended, although a dead drive isn’t much of a recommendation :D).

    It’s an avenue worth checking out.

    ADDITIONAL:

    NOTE, BACKUP VITAL DATA IN SEVERAL LOCATIONS

    #56479

    Crispy Critter
    Participant

    Warranties depend on the manufacturer – Seagate drives generally have 5-year warranties, but on OEM drives they recently dropped it to three years, while the retail kits and external drives are still 5 years.

    #56480

    Rommel
    Participant

    Excellent suggestion PR.
    @peanutsrevenge wrote:

    ADDITIONAL:

    NOTE, BACKUP VITAL DATA IN SEVERAL LOCATIONS

    The storage allotment of most ISPs, Yahoo, the numerous file sharing sites, ECT., should provide adaquate off site storage space for most home users to store non sensitive data.

    Another good thing about these services is that they do redundant back-ups. I’ve never lost anything stored on-line.

    Hopefully she has e-mailed many of the pages to friends and family that still have them.

    #56481

    PeanutsRevenge
    Participant

    Yea, Google Docs service is really good.

    #56482

    Laptops Daddy
    Participant

    @rommel wrote:

    FAT32 or NTFS

    If the data was recorded to the backup in one and is trying to be retrieved by the other, I would expect an error message to that effect. This seems odd. Still, considering the two file system option, and the way this issue came about, it seems that making sure that both the external drive and the OS are using the same file system would be a safe and prudent next step.

    i have to step in here. it wont help poms outcome any, but for posterity, this is nonsense and displays fundamental lack of understanding. very dangerous advice bordering on sabotage* (implying that you may want to format the drive), hopefully immediately obvious as ‘everyones an expert’ internet bullshit.

    a red herring, as rommel would call it : ). most of the rest of rommels advice is sound.

    advice: ask a real life expert or in a tech forum occupied by people with genuine knowledge.

    *unintentional, for sure, but no less dangerous.

    (sorry, rommel. no disrespect)

    #56483

    Rommel
    Participant

    You should have read the next sentence. It said something about checking with the service center to see if their records showed a change from the orignally shipped file system. Not possible to sabatage anything with a phone call that I can remeber unless you have a bomb attached to the ringer on the receiving end.@laptops Daddy wrote:

    @rommel wrote:

    FAT32 or NTFS

    If the data was recorded to the backup in one and is trying to be retrieved by the other, I would expect an error message to that effect. This seems odd. Still, considering the two file system option, and the way this issue came about, it seems that making sure that both the external drive and the OS are using the same file system would be a safe and prudent next step.

    i have to step in here. it wont help poms outcome any, but for posterity, this is nonsense and displays fundamental lack of understanding. very dangerous advice bordering on sabotage* (implying that you may want to format the drive), hopefully immediately obvious as ‘everyones an expert’ internet bullshit.

    a red herring, as rommel would call it : ). most of the rest of rommels advice is sound.

    advice: ask a real life expert or in a tech forum occupied by people with genuine knowledge.

    *unintentional, for sure, but no less dangerous.

    (sorry, rommel. no disrespect)

    Also Mr. Smarty Pants, you are the only one in this thread that has mentioned formatting the drive. Funny stuff.

    I suppose I could convert my laptop to see it causes a problem reading my external, but the answer should be readily available. Does it matter lappy?

    #56484

    Laptops Daddy
    Participant

    rom, just edit the post to remove that advice, and ill edit my quote/reply. theres no shame in it.

    #56485

    Rommel
    Participant

    No need, but since you are here and you know the answer, if I convert to the other file system, with my external out of the picture, could it cause difficulty reading the external when it is reconnected? I don’t have a clue.

    #56486

    Laptops Daddy
    Participant

    @rommel wrote:

    No need, but since you are here and you know the answer, if I convert to the other file system, with my external out of the picture, could it cause difficulty reading the external when it is reconnected? I don’t have a clue.

    no. the file system used on a drive is independent of that used on the next drive. windows xp and later support fat, fat32 and ntfs natively, so theres no issue with drivers.

    *edit, if youre genuinely looking for help, pm me

    #56487

    Rommel
    Participant

    Ok I wasn’t sure that it wasn’t operating system dependent. Just checked and my external is FAT32, which was a surprise, and the internals NTFS as expected.

    I thought it seemed strange that if there was a conflict of that type that an error message wasn’t returned.

    However, as explained, the timing on this problem, seems most strange. As I understand it, the external died while laying on the shelf awaiting the return of the laptop. Unless it’s sticktion, rather uncommon these days and it sounded like the platters spun up, then death from not being used is rare.

    Perhaps they had in use for a few months after they got the laptop back but that wasn’t the way I read it.

    In any case, since it’s crucial that the data be preserved … I stand by seek professional assistance. Me, I’d toss it and not worry too much about it but I’m not writting a book.

    It’s easy to get nudie pictures.

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